What a 13 Year Old Can Teach Us About Customer Service

I have had the good fortune to experience and witness many professionals who truly know how to serve. However, there is one person in particular that consistently blows me away on how he builds rapport instantly with strangers and learns so much about other people in only a few minute conversation. This person is my thirteen-year old son, Bo DiJulius. I have been so intrigued by his ability to strike up a conversation with someone he has never met before and have him or her share so many intimate details with a teenager. So I asked Bo if he could share how he does it.

 

 

Making Customers Feel Like They Are the Real Deal

In the words of Bo DiJulius

Customer Service. Well, if someone asks me what customer service is it’s like tying my shoe. But, not all people know exactly what it is. Especially a teenager like me. Some businesses don’t look at customer service as it should be looked at. Why should they look at it differently? Well, it just makes life easier for so many people including yourself. Treat customers like a celebrity and make them feel special. Make them want to come back. Customer service also helps you. If you leave a mark on someone or treat them very nicely it’s very easy to remember them. Like for example, it’s the first day you see this man walk into the store and you make him feel special and do your job by providing the product he came to your business for but you provided him with a different outlook on his day and even you and the business.

Next time he comes in, you will hopefully say, “Joe, it’s so nice to see you.” Just think about walking into a business with other people there and somebody calling out your name. It would probably seem like you’re an important person. Well, that’s the goal. Make him or her feel like they are the real deal. But, not only for Joe but for Susan and Aaron and Lou. Then, they don’t have to worry about how my shoes are going to look on me or if this dress is cute because with your support they will have such a boost in confidence. This is only one part of customer service. You’ve got to smile, laugh, talk, but not talk about yourself all the time. For example, “Joe, how’s your family been? Joe, how’s your job? Joe, you look very good today, did you get a haircut?” Ask them questions but you can always relate to it in a conversation.

Another important thing is that if you need to bring a mask to work then bring it. If you fought with your boyfriend or husband all night and morning and come to work with negativity, well it’s going to spread like a virus. It will fill the air. Hide your feelings under a mask and at the end of the day that mask might not come off because you feel too good to take it off. You’re making people’s days and releasing stress from yourself. And you meet interesting people when being inquisitive. Not all people are all happy and smiley. But, that should never change you.

Why do I do this? Well, I just love that feeling when you know someone’s  going home with a smile. And that somebody is the person you helped and yourself. Because positivity is just as contagious as negativity. So, fill the air with joy and bright smiles.

I was at the Cheesecake Factory in Buffalo, NY eating with my dad. We were sitting next to a man and a woman. While my dad went to the bathroom, I stopped playing Pokémon Go and said, “Where are you guys from?” The one woman is from Germany and the one man is from Buffalo. They are dating too. I learned so much as we spoke and it was one of the craziest things ever, John Stanz was the mans name. He served, I believe, 10 years in the Marines and was a Staff Sergeant. He was shot in the ear one time and also blown up in a truck by an I.E.D. He broke and tore so many things I can’t remember. He was in a coma for 5 and a half weeks. His family was called out to say their goodbyes because John had a 0% chance of living. His family said NO they will not give up. Which forced his parents to quit their jobs. Amazingly John woke up from his coma but was told that he would never be able to speak or eat on his own or even walk ever again. Almost 2 years go by and John is recovered and was overcoming the impossible. He still has lots of injuries but is a hero.

The thing is what if I didn’t say, “Where are you guys from?” I could’ve missed out on something that inspired me so much. That’s why you have to talk and learn and meet people. Thank you for your time and remember, make them feel like they are the real deal so you can be the real deal. If you ever want to contact me, then email me at bodijulius9@gmail.com, @bodijulius on Twitter and Instagram. You’ll find the kid who is learning and living an amazing life thanks to my amazing father and two brothers who taught me it all. Thank you and have a great day.

Customer Xperience ArchitectDave Murray is the Senior Customer Experience Consultant of The DiJulius Group. Dave works daily with the best Customer eXperience Executives around the world, helping them generate ideas, turning ideas into systems, and then implementing and executing them enterprise wide. His strength is making Customer Experience measureable and accountable. As a result of Dave’s expertise, we are having him present two breakout sessions this September 29 at the 2016 Secret Service Summit; one on Mapping your Customer’s Experience and facilitating a panel of Customer eXperience Executives during his second breakout session.

Breakout Topic #1: CX Journey Mapping

So many organizations strive to have great service, but so few take the time to show employees how to provide great service. Journey Mapping is the place to start. In the Journey Mapping process, we explore three crucial elements of the journey your customers are taking. The outcome is a manual for all current and future employees to follow that simplifies training and helps ensure a consistent experience. Also, your organization will have a set of non-negotiable standards to deliver to every customer, every time.

Breakout Topic #2: CXEA Panel

The fastest growing C-Suite position continues to be a CXO, Chief Experience Officer (or CCO, Chief Customer Officer).  The Customer Experience Executive Academy was created to teach this new breed of executives the skills needed to create and maintain a service culture within their organization. This panel will be made up of CXEA alumni so you can learn first hand how they have taken classroom learning and implemented it within their organizations. This panel will include a question and answer session of participants.

*Related – Sheldon Harris Presenting at the 2016 Secret Service Summit

About The Author

John DiJulius

John R. DiJulius is a best-selling author, consultant, keynote speaker and President of The DiJulius Group, the leading Customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on Customer experience trends and best practices.

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